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Come with us and discover the icons of the Berlin landscape and the history behind them. From the famous Brandenburg Gate to the deep remembrance at the Holocaust Memorial – this is what makes our city special!

Brandenburger Gate: Survivor of two world wars and embodying a dead zone during the Cold War, this historical sight is undoubtedly THE most famous landmark in all of Germany! Dating back to 1788, when King Friederich Wilhelm II of Prussia ordered the gate as a symbol of peace, it was one of 17 gates that provided access to Berlin at the time. Architect Carl Gotthard Langhans, in charge of coordinating the project from 1788 to 1791, used the Propylaeum (the entrance to the Acropolis in Athens, Greece) as inspiration for the Gate. The famous statue on the top of the gate is called the Quadriga, where Irene – the Greek goddess who symbolizes peace – guides the chariot with her four horses. After WWII, only one of the heads of one of the horses survived the bombing, which now can be found at the Markisches Museum. Although, before the fall of the Wall, it was viewed as a symbol of divided Germany, the Brandenburg gate now represents a symbol of reunification and freedom.

Siegessäule:  the Berlin victory column was designed by architect Heinrich Strack, who was hired to design the column after the Danish-Prussian war in which the Prussians defeated the Danish in 1864. By the time of its completion in 1873, the Prussians had also defeated the French and the Austrians. Due to the second victory, the extravagant “Victoria” statue was added on top of the column. The column’s original location was Königsplatz, but the Nazis moved the column in 1930 to where it stands today. Due to this move, it actually survived the bombings of WWII. However, this move has also stained the reputation of the column, as some connect it to a Nazi symbol. Either way, it is worth a visit and walk to, or from the Brandenburg Gate.

East Side Gallery: with 1,316 meters in length, this gallery is the longest open-air gallery that exists worldwide. The gallery, consisting of the Berlin Wall that separated west and east, is now made up of various artworks, which artists put on the wall after it fell- redefining this gruesome border. It not only acts as a memorial for the people trying to escape eastern Germany, but it also portrays a sign of freedom. The famous drawings on the Wall vary from  Honecker and Breschnew kissing, to a Trabant (east german car) bursting through the wall.

Berliner Dom: One of the largest Protestant churches in Berlin is located on Museum Island. The Berliner Dom has origins back to 1465  when the catholic St. Emanuel’s Chapel was named a collegiate church, which translates to “Domkirche”. In 1750, the church was completely rebuilt. Later, In 1892, the Dom was completely refurbished showing more and more resemblance to the Dom which can be seen today. However, after WWII, the Dom suffered significant damage which was only temporarily fixed. Thorough renovations started in 1975, due to funding from the German Government it finished 27 years later in 2002.

Jewish Memorial:  the 19,000 metre² (200,000 ft²) area covered with 2,7000 thousand concrete slabs so-called „stelae“ is known as the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe or the Holocaust Memorial. It was opened in 2005 and designed by architect Peter Eisenman, dedicated to the more than six million Jews who were murdered in WWII, the genocide known as the Holocaust. The idea of corroborating the victims of the holocaust in Berlin only appeared in the late 1980s. However, although government funding was quickly available, it took another 10 years of political debate to agree on the design of the project.

Written by: Cilia Trendelenburg

 

Steglitz-Zehlendorf is one of the more affluent areas of Berlin – the idyll and tranquillity, far from the big city’s hustle and bustle, provides a much sought-after balance.  Above all, The district is characterized by quiet residential areas, forests, and tranquility provided by the proximity to the numerous lakes.

Steglitz is closest to City-West and very urban. It is considered a middle-class residential neighborhood with excellent shopping facilities. It is well connected to the rest of the city by U-bahn and buses. Schloßstraße in Steglitz is a shopping mile, it features several malls and all the typical high street stores, restaurants, supermarkets and a weekly market.

Dahlem district is one of the most expensive residential areas in Berlin.  It is a science research location, home to the Free University of Berlin (FU), numerous research institutes, and many museums have been established here.

As you travel further South-West to Zehlendorf, Schlachtensee, Nikolasee and Wannsee almost 50% of these districts consist of water and forest. Several lakes attract the inhabitants of Berlin to the cool water in hot temperatures. Particularly popular is the Großer Wannsee, and its lido opened in 1907 – but the other lakes of the district are also worth a visit.

For those seeking recreation, numerous sports clubs and the Botanical Garden offer a balance to everyday life. The area is home to several international schools and a large English-speaking community.

Rents in this district are high, but there is a choice between social housing, city villas, and single-family homes.

The western part of Zehlendorf with Wannsee, Nikolassee, and Schlachtensee is upscale and exclusive. In the south and east, the residential areas are simpler and somewhat less expensive. Steglitz itself is still very urban with mixed rents. Lankwitz and Lichterfelde have a more small-town feel and have more reasonable-priced rents.

Zehlendorf Mitte also features a town center with a large variety of shops, doctor’s practices, restaurants, and the Zehlendorf Rathaus.

There are also small ‚town‘ centers in Dahlem, Schlachtensee, Mexicoplatz, Nikolasee, Lichterfelde and Wannsee – all with opportunities for bakeries, grocery shopping, bookstores and restaurants.

Places of Interest:

About the author

Hi there! I’m Juli, I have german roots but I grew up in New Zealand and have been living in Germany since 2004. I love sharing my passion for Berlin and all it has to offer with new ‚Berliners‘ and through my work as a freelance Relocation Consultant with IRC I have the opportunity to do so.

The most important ingredient for a successful international transfer of your employees is the timely approval of all necessary applications. Our many years of experience with all the formalities of a visa application, the work and residence permit as well as the local authority procedures enable us to provide you with the best possible support in this process.

Our distinctive expertise and our excellent contacts to the authorities guarantee a speedy issue of all necessary permits for a smooth employee relocation. Entering Germany for a short-term employment relationship or starting a new job requires more than just arriving at the airport. The specific bureaucratic requirements of the Federal Republic of Germany, with different processes in the individual federal states, can be confusing and lead to unnecessary delays.

You can rely on our competent and comprehensive solutions and professional support for the relocation of your employees within Germany or for your intra-company assignees from abroad to Germany. IRC accompanies you and your employees with all requirements of a successful move.

Berlin has an exquisite variety when it comes to shops and restaurants but also offers a huge variety of street markets.

From culturally diverse street food and fresh produce markets to individual and sustainable handmade and second-hand shopping markets, one can easily spend some time strolling through these locations.

Below are listed some of our favorites!

Food markets: Markthalle Neun:  this food hall is filled with food stands that offer a variety of different cuisines from your typical pasta stand to American BBQ and also Turkish delights. You can top this food experience by grabbing a delicious ice cream at Rosa Canina’s stand!

Thai-park: If you’re craving some traditional and local Thai food, check out this market happening every Saturday and Sunday at Preußenpark! Individuals familiar with Thai, Vietnamese, and Korean cuisine set up numerous stands offering price-friendly and delicious sweet and savory dishes! 

Mauerpark :   From traditional Berliner sausages to Spanish paella, one has a variety of options to quench your appetite at this street food market located at Mauerpark!

Weekly Markets (fresh produce): 

Markt am Winterfeldtplatz: This market held every Wednesday and Saturday, located by Nollendorfplatz, offers a variety of local produce and food stands- if you’re there around lunchtime grab some delicious tacos at El Mexicano

Marheineke Halle: Open every day besides Sundays, grab your fresh foods at this indoor market hall located by Bergmannstraße. 

 Wochenmarkt am Karl-August Platz: another comprehensive food market offering numerous fresh produce stands, open Wednesdays and Saturdays!  

Kollwitzmarkt: After or before getting your coffee in this gorgeous neighborhood, discover one of Berlin’s notorious local produce markets, offering a variety of fresh goods! Thursdays, this market dedicates its stands to organic-only produce. 

Türkish Market: get mountains of local and delicious produce at this market for reasonable prices! Although less fresh, the prices drop even lower the later you go! 

For further weekly markets in your neighborhood check out:

https://www.wochenmarkt-deutschland.de/maerkte/berlin/wochenmaerkte-in-berlin/

Vintage market: 

Mauerpark: You can easily spend hours at this flea market every Sunday! Since most attractions and shops are closed on Sunday, this is the place many spend their Sunday morning and afternoon at. You may find various hidden gems ranging from jewelry to outdoor furniture! 

Flohmarkt U Fehrbelliner Platz:  Also open on Saturdays and Sundays, right next to Thaipark, this second-hand market has numerous stands that sell antiques and vintage clothing and goods for reasonable prices! 

 

RAW Gelände: Although the RAW site is known for its nightlife, it also transforms into a culturally diverse flea market on Sunday morning and afternoon!  After strolling through this market, you can have a beer or drink with some delicious burgers or pizza at the beer garden also located on-site! 

Written by Cilia Trendelenburg

 

Berlin, one of Europe’s largest and most diverse culture hubs, offers a variety of
unique and interesting art experiences, designed for a broad range of individual tastes.

This summer, after a season of empty galleries and museums, numerous galleries and exhibitions were able to reopen and present the work of many talented artists. From Studio Berghain Berlin, an art exhibition located in Berlin’s notorious nightclub Berghain, to Diversity United at the old Tempelhofer airport,
Berlin offers countless unique experiences that are definitely worth checking out!
Listed below are a few galleries and ongoing exhibitions to explore.

Exhibitions:

Diversity United
(9 June-19. September 2021) – Tempelhof Airport halls 2 and 3

This exhibition, located at Tempelhofer Airport showcases 90 artists from 34 different countries, exploring Europe’s diverse art scene

Studio Berghain Berlin

(18. June- 29. August 2021)-  Berghain club Am Wriezener Bahnhof, 10243 Berlin

Located in Berlin’s iconic nightclub Berghain, this exhibition explores  the work of various Berlin artists, focusing on photography, sculptures, painting, video, and sound installations. On top of the art, visitors are able to experience the exclusive nightclub, with rules like “no photos in the club” still set in place

Berlin Global

(From July 2021) Humboldt Forum

This exhibition is located in a 4,000 m space with several rooms exploring Berlin’s diversity through various forms of art. The focus of the exhibition is placed on our socially networked environment. Go check out their website, where you are able to take a 360° online  tour of the exhibition.

Dark Matter

(From 4. June- 5. September 2021) Köpenicker Chaussee 46, 10317 Berlin

This “multidimensional parallel world of light, space and sound”,  in pitch balck rooms situated in a factory setting, presents various shapes and colors through digital constellations and interactive 3D structures

 

Art Galleries to check out (exhibitions vary):

C/O Berlinspecializes on photography and digital media (Hardenbergstraße 22-24, 10623 Berlin)

Galerie Thomas Schulte- international conceptual art  (Charlottenstraße 24, 10117 Berlin)

Haus der Kulturen der Welt international contemporary art and

debate (exhibitions, performances, concerts etc.)

(John-Foster-Dulles-Allee 10, 10557 Berlin)

Schinkel Pavillon  contemporary sculpture, installations and media

art  (Oberwallstraße 32, 10117 Berlin)

Neue Nationalgaleriemuseum for modern art in Berlin (newly reopened)

Potsdamer Straße 50, 10785 Berlin

KW Institute for Contemporary Art – focused on contemporary art (Auguststraße 69, 10117 Berlin)

Sprüth Magers – contemporary art gallery with other locations in

London and  Los Angeles (Oranienburger Str. 18, 10178 Berlin)

Written by Cilia Trendelenburg

 

 

 

 

 

The multicultural district of Tempelhof-Schöneberg is known for its parks, such as Tempelhofer Feld on a former airport site, the Park am Gleisdreieck, and the Natur-Park Südgelände, both former industrial sites. People from a wide range of social classes and cultures live in Tempelhof-Schöneberg making it wonderfully colorful and diverse.

Situated in the south of the city, it shares borders with Mitte and Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg in the north, Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf and Steglitz-Zehlendorf in the west as well as Neukölln in the east.

In the northern part of the district, urban life pulsates around the KaDeWe department store. You’ll find charming galleries, Turkish and Arabic restaurants, and upcoming new restaurants on Potsdamer Strasse. The cafés on Motzstrasse, and the area around Nollendorfplatz, are a little capital for the LGBTQ community.

Schöneberg has a varied and interesting historical and cultural history that continues to influence it to this day. David Bowie, the Comedian Harmonists, Marlene Dietrich, Günter Grass, and Billy Wilder all made the district their home. During the partition of Germany, the historical Rathaus Schöneberg became the town hall of West Berlin and is the famous location where, 50 years ago, John F. Kennedy made his famous speech, proclaiming “Ich bin ein Berliner.”

The highest quality of life offered in the renovated old buildings in Bayerisches Viertel (Bavarian quarter) between Viktoria-Luise-Platz and Bayrischer Platz. The entire neighborhood impresses with cafés, restaurants, and shopping opportunities.

Tempelhof is a mix of housing estates, apartment blocks, parks, industrial sites, and shopping centers. There are many parks and green spaces, particularly since 2008, when the Tempelhof Airport was decommissioned and turned into a public field. Another highlight in Templehof is the Tempelhofer Hafen, a little harbor on the water with restaurants, boats, and a big shopping mall.

Localities of Tempelhof – Schöneberg: Schöneberg, Friedenau,Tempelhof, Mariendorf, Marienfelde, Lichtenrade

 

The district Treptow-Köpenick emerged after the 2001 administrative reform by merging the previously independent districts. It is Berlin’s district with the largest area and lowest population density, consisting of seventy percent water and parkland. The district has a unique natural beauty, which makes it stand out. Fifteen localities that stretch from some of the trendiest parts of the inner-city to the southernmost border’s sleepy villages are part of this district. Ideal for nature lovers, the Köpenick Forest is the largest forest area in Berlin.
Müggelsee is the city’s biggest lake, and along the banks of the River Spree, Treptow Park boasts beautiful meadows and picnic areas. With a wide variety of residential areas to choose from and some of the most competitive rental prices, Treptow-Köpenick is a district that deserves attention.
The rental prices range between 11.95 -16.00 Euros per sq meter (2020).

Localities of Treptow – Köpenick: Köpenick, Treptow, Oberschöneweide, Grünau, Schmöckwitz, Müggelheim, Rahnsdorf, Friedrichshagen, Plänterwald, Baumschulenweg, Johannisthal, Niederschönedweide, Adlershof, Altglienicke, Bohnsdorf

Points of Interest include:

  • Müggelturm (popular day-trip destination in Köpenick with a spectacular view)
  • Altstadt Köpenick (small streets and old buildings from the medieval period)
  • Schloss Köpenick (the palace of Köpenick houses treasures from the Kunstgewerbemuseum
  • Soviet War Memorial (Treptower Park)
  • Falkenberg garden city (Falkenberg Gartenstadt – early example of social housing)
  • Schöneweide Industrial museum (industrial history of Schöneweide as an industrial zone from Bismarck to the present)
  • Archenhold Observatory in Treptower Park (the longest extendable and pointable telescope in the world)
  • Nazi Forced Labour Documentation Centre (Memorial to the Former Forced Labour Camp in Schöneweide)
  • Stadttheater Köpenick (family theatre)

Reinickendorf was formed in 1920 from Reinickendorf, Wittenau, Tegel, Heiligensee, Hermsdorf, Lübars, and three estate districts. In addition to many forests and bodies of water, Reinickendorf also has two large high-rise housing estates – Weiße Stadt and Märkisches Viertel. It is a green district with much of the western part comprising the Tegel Forest (Tegeler Forst) and Lake Tegel (Tegeler See). Due to large green spaces, Reinickendorf has the third-lowest population of all Berlin districts.  The median rent price is between 10 – 15 Euros per sq meter (2020).

Reinickendorf’s offerings range from almost village-like districts such as Heiligensee, Konradshöhe, and Lübars to urban neighborhoods such as Reinickendorf and Tegel, Märkisches Viertel, and Wittenau. Waidmannslust, Hermsdorf, and Frohnau are also relatively quiet places to live. In the latter, the single-family homes that dominate the district often have the character of villas.

Localities of Reinickendorf: Frohnau, Heiligensee, Hermsdorf, Konradshöhe, Lübars, Märkisches Viertel, Reinickendorf, Tegel, Waidmannslust, Wittenau, Reinickendorf

While some of the localities have their origin as rural villages founded in the 13th century, most of the district’s history began in the 19th century. It developed as an industrial powerhouse for the city.

Reinickendorf is located in the northwest of Berlin. Neighboring districts are Spandau in the southwest, Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf in the south, Mitte in the southeast, and Pankow in the east. The entire north borders on the Brandenburg district of Oberhavel.

Points of Interest include:

  • Schloss Tegel
  • Theravada Buddhist temple complex in Frohnau (Buddhistisches Haus). It is considered to be the oldest and largest Theravada Buddhist center in Europe and has been declared a National Heritage site
  • The side farmstead of the Bauernhof Großkopf, Alt-Reinickendorf 37
  • Segenskirche
  • The Weiße Stadt (built between 1929 and 1931), ranks today as one of the key housing estates of Berlin modernism. UNESCO World Heritage Site since 2008 Cultural heritage monuments Little Lette-Colony
  • Museum Reinickendorf
  • Hannah-Höch-Haus
  • Village church in Alt- Reinickendorf (Dorfkirche in Alt-Reinickendorf) Borsigturm – a landmark of the Borsig Werke, where steam locomotives were manufactured (first high-rise building constructed in Berlin and a highlight of Berlin Modernism

 

Moving abroad is a very exciting prospect, however, the details of relocation can also be very daunting. Navigating a new system, a new language and dealing with formalities can be a challenge, this is where private relocation support can make all the difference.

Your top priorities when relocating to a new city should be visa (immigration), finding a place to live (home search), employment or educational opportunities and integration. Your relocation consultant can advise you on your options in advance.

Visa/Immigration: the type of visa you are eligible for will largely be linked to your country of origin, employment situation or educational studies. It is very important to know your options for immigration before you plan a move. IRC Berlin has the expert knowledge to guide you through your visa & immigration options.

Home search: knowing the housing market, areas of the city, and ballpark figures for rental costs/utilities is key for a successful home search. It is helpful to have a realistic expectation when you consult with your relocation assistant about what will be most suitable for you. IRC Berlin consultants have extensive knowledge of the city and can advise you as to the perfect match for you regarding area, amenities, public transport needs.

Cultural integration: This is where IRC can help, we offer intercultural training for new arrivals and their families to make their start in the new and foreign environment as easy as possible. Giving an insight into cultural differences, those ‘quirky’ German ways, and just how to navigate the German business landscape.

IRC Berlin is branching out into private relocation offering all the same benefits as we offer to our corporate clients. Our experienced consultants can support and assist every step of the way from visa and immigration, work permits, home search to giving a comprehensive orientation tour upon arrival. We want to make you feel at home in Germany and to make your transition process pleasant and successful so that all you need to worry about is enjoying your new home!

Nagesh, his wife Aditi and their 3-year-old son Aadish moved from Nürnberg to Berlin in the Spring of 2020. They are originally from India, but had been living in Germany for a couple of years already. Nagesh was offered a new position at the Schindler office in Berlin. 

They didn’t know Berlin very well, Nagesh had visited for business and many years ago for a weekend trip and had a good impression from those visits. They were excited about the prospect of moving to a bigger city with more diversity and they say they have been pleasantly surprised about the city since they moved because it is so international.

IRC Consultant Sabina Heyn was assigned to assist them with the relocation. The pandemic was a real factor in limiting how clients would usually be able to view apartments – so Sabina sent examples of apartments on the market in order to give them an idea what was possible within the budget in regards to style, size, amenities. This gave Nagesh and Aditi a chance to point out the types of apartments they liked and to really clarify for Sabina what they were looking for. For them it wasn’t so much the area of Berlin which was important but more that the apartment suited their needs and would feel like home to them and relatively close proximity to Nagesh’s office, to keep daily travel time reasonable.

They expected the process to be quite arduous because they had heard the market was difficult in Berlin. However they were incredibly fortunate, Sabina showed them two apartments, one in Charlottenburg and one in Südkreuz. The apartment in Südkreuz was in a newly built complex, which also included a Kindergarten. It was 5km from Nagesh’s office and suited all their other requirements. Their son was offered a spot in the new Kindergarten, which opens in Nov 2020 – this sealed the deal.

6 months later, the family has settled in Berlin. They say that despite the unusual circumstances of 2020 it has been a good move for them. They enjoy their new home and really like the area they live in, Aadish is about to start at his new kindergarten and they look forward to really getting to enjoy Berlin post-covid!

Favourite place in Berlin – We haven’t seen a lot but Tiergarten was our best place so far (for families

A hidden Gem in Berlin – we haven’t discovered one yet!

Best day trip from Berlin – We like day trips to small towns like Dresden or Leipzig. We liked both of these from our visits before.

Great place to eat – We haven’t tried a lot of places to eat yet but can recommend an Indian place called Swadishta.

About the author

Hi there! My name is Juli Buchanan. I have German roots but I grew up in New Zealand and I have been living in Germany since 2004. I love sharing my passion for Berlin and all it has to offer with new ‚Berliners‘ and through my work as a freelance Relocation Consultant with IRC I have the opportunity to do so.

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