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Nagesh, his wife Aditi and their 3-year-old son Aadish moved from Nürnberg to Berlin in the Spring of 2020. They are originally from India, but had been living in Germany for a couple of years already. Nagesh was offered a new position at the Schindler office in Berlin. 

They didn’t know Berlin very well, Nagesh had visited for business and many years ago for a weekend trip and had a good impression from those visits. They were excited about the prospect of moving to a bigger city with more diversity and they say they have been pleasantly surprised about the city since they moved because it is so international.

IRC Consultant Sabina Heyn was assigned to assist them with the relocation. The pandemic was a real factor in limiting how clients would usually be able to view apartments – so Sabina sent examples of apartments on the market in order to give them an idea what was possible within the budget in regards to style, size, amenities. This gave Nagesh and Aditi a chance to point out the types of apartments they liked and to really clarify for Sabina what they were looking for. For them it wasn’t so much the area of Berlin which was important but more that the apartment suited their needs and would feel like home to them and relatively close proximity to Nagesh’s office, to keep daily travel time reasonable.

They expected the process to be quite arduous because they had heard the market was difficult in Berlin. However they were incredibly fortunate, Sabina showed them two apartments, one in Charlottenburg and one in Südkreuz. The apartment in Südkreuz was in a newly built complex, which also included a Kindergarten. It was 5km from Nagesh’s office and suited all their other requirements. Their son was offered a spot in the new Kindergarten, which opens in Nov 2020 – this sealed the deal.

6 months later, the family has settled in Berlin. They say that despite the unusual circumstances of 2020 it has been a good move for them. They enjoy their new home and really like the area they live in, Aadish is about to start at his new kindergarten and they look forward to really getting to enjoy Berlin post-covid!

Favourite place in Berlin – We haven’t seen a lot but Tiergarten was our best place so far (for families

A hidden Gem in Berlin – we haven’t discovered one yet!

Best day trip from Berlin – We like day trips to small towns like Dresden or Leipzig. We liked both of these from our visits before.

Great place to eat – We haven’t tried a lot of places to eat yet but can recommend an Indian place called Swadishta.

About the author

Hi there! My name is Juli Buchanan. I have German roots but I grew up in New Zealand and I have been living in Germany since 2004. I love sharing my passion for Berlin and all it has to offer with new ‚Berliners‘ and through my work as a freelance Relocation Consultant with IRC I have the opportunity to do so.

One of the hardest things about moving abroad is leaving behind family and friends. So it’s a great idea to find ways to keep in touch and make sure you keep the support network back home with you in your new home. Communication is key!

Inform yourself on the time difference between your new home and ‚back home‘ – let family and friends know when is a good time to reach you. There are some excellent ways to keep in touch such as a family blog, skype, WhatsApp calls, facetime and emails. Especially if you are on an assignment for a certain amount of time and will be returning back after a year or two, this will help keep the special people in your life close.

Moving abroad is a hugely exciting and rewarding experience, but it can also can lead to people feeling stressed and at times very lonely, especially if you move to a place where the language and culture are not familiar. Keeping your ties to family and friends back home can help alleviate these symptoms. Make sure you let them know how you are feeling and what you are experiencing, even if at times it isn’t all good news.

Resource:

Helpful advice: Things I wish I would have known when I moved to Germany

Writing a blog: https://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Travel-Blog

Moving Abroad: https://www.ring.md/blog/issues-and-depression-after-moving-abroad/

About the author

Hi there! My name is Juli Buchanan. I have German roots but I grew up in New Zealand and I have been living in Germany since 2004. I love sharing my passion for Berlin and all it has to offer with new ‚Berliners‘ and through my work as a freelance Relocation Consultant with IRC I have the opportunity to do so.

„Christmas isn’t just a day, it’s a frame of mind.“ – December is finally upon us, let the spirit fill your heart and enjoy what Berlin has to offer in the most wonderful and cheerful of seasons. (Quote from the motion Picture ‚Miracle on 34th Street‘)

It is one of the most stunning times of the year in Germany, thus also in Berlin and surrounding areas. The 4 weeks before Christmas Eve (Heiligabend) are truly a magical time. Germany is famous for it’s Christmas markets (Weihnachtsmärkte), Mulled wine (Glühwein), roasted Chestnuts (Heiße Maronen) and the many other treats available during the festive season. Take a break from the gloomy weather and indulge in some delicious treats with friends and family under twinkling lights.

Berlin has many Christmas markets to choose from, some of the most beautiful include the ones at the Gendarmenmarkt and at the Schloß Charlottenburg. However, there are many more Christmas markets to discover over the month of December including many internationally-themed markets such as the Swedish Christmas Bazaar or the very British Christmas Market at St Georges Church in Westend. It is even worth venturing out to Potsdam and visiting the Christmas market ‚Blauer Lichterglanz‘ on Brandenburger Straße and/or the romantic Christmas village at the Krongut Bornstedt in all it’s glory.

One more tip, the Botanic Gardens in Dahlem have a Christmas Garden, a walk through a winter wonderland of lights.

For a list of Markets visit: https://www.visitberlin.de/en/christmas-markets-berlin



About the author

Hi there! I’m Juli, German roots but I grew up in New Zealand and have been living in Germany since 2004. I love sharing my passion for Berlin and all it has to offer with new ‚Berliners‘ and through my work as a freelance Relocation Consultant with IRC I have the opportunity to do so.



It is no secret that moving is stressful, then if you add moving to another country and bringing a family then the idea can seem exciting but at the same time very daunting. Not only will the person being relocated be starting a new job, which in itself is a big change but there will be a lot of other adjustments on a personal level.

A new country may mean new language, new culture and a completely new place to navigate. It is very important to do your research and have some idea of what will be expecting you when you arrive. This will help you to feel a little more secure and confident in this awesome adventure ahead!

Your first port of call, if you have a chance is to connect with colleagues or perhaps even friends or acquaintances who might be able to give you an insight into your new home city. Talk through some of their experiences and ask lots of questions. There are also many blogs & ex-pat groups on Social Media, make use of these, ask other ’new Berliners‘ your specific questions and get advice on topics which will be important to you in your new home. Lastly, your relocation consultant, make use of this fantastic resource, explain where you are coming from and what your needs will be, especially regarding your spouse and children.

Language – Berlin is very international and most germans speak reasonable English, however, it is very important for your integration to learn some german. It will help with integration in all areas but especially for meeting new people and community – which in turn is crucial to feeling at home longterm in a new place. Spouses and children should also do a german course if possible. Let people you meet know you don’t speak the language but you are willing to learn, this always help break the ice.

Culture – there is no doubt you will experience all kinds of cultural differences. Be open, be willing to learn and you can read about some of those quirky german ways here…. Germans are generally open and interested in people from other places. Berlin is very multi-cultural and there is a good chance you will also have plenty of opportunity to connect with people from your home country if you would like, this often helps to alleviate homesickness.

Weather – this seems like it wouldn’t be important but it is. If you are coming from a much warmer or sunnier climate then you will find that you should make yourself familiar with what to expect in Berlin. Spring is the awakening after what can be a very long, cold and dark Winter. Summer is usually good and it can be very hot at times, up to 35-39 degrees Celcius. Fall is usually mild with a good mix of rain and shine, golden and a very beautiful time of year and then from mid to late October Winter can appear again and last through to March or even April. Winters can be extremely cold, temperatures plummeting to -10 degrees Celcius at times – a good winter wardrobe is required for all the family, especially children, as in Kindergarten and school the children will spend time playing outside no matter what the weather.

Children: Schools/Kindergarten – It is vital that you do your research regarding how your children will be integrated in your new home town. If you have kindergarten or school-age children, it is important to have an idea what is on offer and particularly if your children have any special needs – how/if these can/will be catered to. International schools may offer a familiar environment but if you are thinking of entering the german school system then it is advisable to understand the basics of how the system is set up and what will be required especially if your children are not yet speaking the language.

A move with children is a big upheaval, but the great news is, children especially those attending school and kindergarten tend to integrate the fastest due to their open nature and quick ability to pick up on language.

The success of a relocation with a family is ensuring every family member is well taken care of and happy. Moving to a new place is such a fantastic experience which will teach life long lessons and make precious memories for life.

Some resources below:

www.berlinforallthefamily.com

www.toytowngermany.com

www.thelocal.de/20170814/how-living-in-berlin-has-changed-me-for-life

www.german-way.com/tag/raising-children-in-germany/

About the author

Hi there! I’m Juli, German roots but I grew up in New Zealand and have been living in Germany since 2004. I love sharing my passion for Berlin and all it has to offer with new ‚Berliners‘ and through my work as a freelance Relocation Consultant with IRC I have the opportunity to do so.

From the 11-20th of October, 2019 the nights in Berlin will be bathed in stunning colours thanks to the ‚Festival of Lights‚.  Sunset is around 6.15pm and as the daylight fades, the Festival of Lights begins. This spectacle is definitely worth an evening out with family or friends, wrap up warm and take a magical walk through the city. 

Berlin will turn into the largest open-air gallery in the world: and again, the most important landmarks, building and squares will be enlighted with sensational projections, magical 3D-Videoshow and breathtaking light installations related to this year’s theme “Lights of Freedom”. On the occasion of the anniversary “30 years fall of the Berlin Wall” we will transform the city of freedom into a colossal stage and tell touching stories: expressive, emotional, amusing, surprising and unexpected. The Berlin Festival Of Lights connects diverse cultures and people throughout the world and easily transcends borders and continents – because lights speaks all languages. (source: https://festival-of-lights.de/en/) 

You can pick a neighbourhood or walk along the route on the map shown on the illumination plan – https://festival-of-lights.de/wp-content/uploads/Illuminationsplan.pdf

About the author

Hi there! I’m Juli, German roots but I grew up in New Zealand and have been living in Germany since 2004. I love sharing my passion for Berlin and all it has to offer with new ‚Berliners‘ and through my work as a freelance Relocation Consultant with IRC I have the opportunity to do so.

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